These 100s and 1000s biscuits gave me so much joy as a kid. They were a staple treat in our kitchen while we were growing up in Australia. What kid can resist bright and colourful sprinkles? They’re like the biscuit version of fairybread. If you’re Aussie you know exactly what I’m talking about. To make fairy bread you get white sandwich bread, butter the top, sprinkle 100s and 1000s on top, then cut them into triangles and serve. Yes, we really ate butter and sprinkles on bread. Fairybread is pretty much one of Australia’s national dishes. No children’s party was complete without a platter of fairy bread triangles on the table.

So it’s no surprise that these 100s and 1000s biscuits were so popular to bake. They’re just slightly buttery sugar cookies with hundreds and thousands baked into the top. They’re not overly sweet and sugary. And they’re so fast and easy to bake that kids can get involved baking too. I’ve got the original 30-year-old recipe below. Happy baking!

Adapted from The Big Book of Beautiful Biscuits (1986)

You will need: 

  • Large baking sheet
  • Rolling pin
  • 50mm (2.75in) round cookie cutter
  • Pastry brush

100s and 1000s Biscuits

100s and 1000s Biscuits
Cake Mistress Print Recipe
Print Recipe
It’s no surprise that these 100s and 1000s biscuits were so popular to bake. They’re just slightly buttery sugar cookies with hundreds and thousands baked into the top. They’re not overly sweet and sugary. And they’re so fast and easy to bake that kids can get involved baking too. I've got the original 30-year-old recipe below.
Servings: biscuits, approx.
Units:

Ingredients

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 180 degrees Celsius (160 fan-forced; 350F). Line a large baking sheet with baking paper.
  2. Add the softened butter, sugar, and vanilla extract to the bowl of an electric mixer. Cream together until pale and fluffy.
  3. Add the egg and milk, and whisk in until well combined.
  4. Add the self raising flour, plain flour, and salt. Stir together until a firm dough forms. Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured bench, roll it into a disc, and wrap the dough in plastic wrap.
  5. Let the dough rest in the fridge for 1 hour.
  6. Remove dough from the fridge. Roll out the dough to about 5mm thick. It’s easiest to roll the dough between two sheets of baking paper. Press the cookie cutter edge into a little flour, then cut out the biscuits.
  7. Place the cut out biscuits onto the baking sheet. These biscuits won’t spread far as they bake if you rested the dough in the fridge, so you won’t need to leave lots of space between each biscuit. Brush the top with some milk, then sprinkle the 100s and 1000s on top.
  8. Place the baking sheet on the middle rack of the oven. Bake for 8-10 minutes. The biscuits are ready when the base is golden brown. Remove the tray from the oven and let the biscuits cool on the tray for at least 10 minutes before transferring them to a cooling rack.

Baking Tips

  • Letting the dough chill in the fridge stops the dough from spreading out in the oven and causing misshapen biscuits.

These sugar biscuits covered in 100s and 1000s were really popular with Australian kids in the 80s and 90s.